Summary

This specification discusses including Déjà Dup, a backup tool for non-technical users, by default.

Rationale

Providing an easy-to-use backup solution that's suitable for non-expert users is important. Expert users should install and/or use a more sophisticated backup system. Part of the rationale is to tell the user exactly what he has to do, rather than leave it for him to think up a backup schema.

Prior Art

Specs

Community

User stories

(Collected from previous specs)

6.06 Spec

6.10 Spec

See original spec for its user stories. They're arguably ignorable as they are written specifically to fit HUBackup, not the other way around.

9.04 Spec

Quick Sell

Room for Improvement

Implementation

Upstream Oneiric Cycle Changes

Steps to Pull the Trigger

Discussion Topics

Notes from UDS

http://summit.ubuntu.com/uds-o/meeting/desktop-o-deja-dup-default/

    Deja Dup is a simplified backup tool for Ubuntu and aimed at desktop users

    Has been around for several years

    Based on duplicity ( http://duplicity.nongnu.org/ )

    Backup has come up several times at UDS

    Deja Dup is not intended to meet all use cases for backup, but will covery many of the common use cases

    Alternatives are:

    Simple Backup

    Back in Time

    Bacula

    Alternative solutions are typically more complicated and have little integration into Ubuntu

    Deja Dup could be integrated into Ubuntu One

    Possible objections are that Deja Dup may commit us to a particular backup format

    Depends on duplicity which can be a risk

    This does however, give the user a fallback in case the front end is not working

    Can we handle a large increase in bug reports from including Deja Dup by default? (and will a significant number of users have a bad/damaging experience)?

    The current bug traffic is not very high

    Fedora have included Deja Dup by default since Fedora 13, and we have not seen a large increase in bug reports

    Existing problems have been able to be resolved, either by using duplicity directly, or by updated deja-dup (no dataloss)

    Documentation on recovery is included in the package

    Release from yesterday integrates into GNOME 3

    Enforces regular backups and reminds the user if their chosen backup medium is unavailable

    Could be integrated into the install process, but would need Design help

    Deja Dup is accessible, and testing is currently automated

    Backup files can be restored to an alternate location

    Can be as little as 3.0 MBs - as much as 5.9 MBs (uncompressed)

Questions:-

    If we ship it on the CD, is it possible for someone to do a 'full restore' using the CD and some backup media (such as a usb disk)? - popey

    It would be on the CD, point it to original hard drive if you use the LiveCD

Links:

    http://live.gnome.org/DejaDup/

    https://wiki.ubuntu.com/DesktopTeam/Specs/Oneiric/DejaDup

Action items:

    Determine the effect on CD space

    Have another session for making the UI

    File MIRs for: 

    deja-dup 

    duplicity 

    librsync 

    python-rackspace-cloudfiles (optional) 

    Change desktop seed to Recommend deja-dup 

    Drop deja-dup from the Featured app set 

Action Items

Comments

Leave any comments here please!

pitti, 2011-05-18: I call the non-availability of removable optical media a feature. Home users are prone to eventually forget or get bored by doing this every day. Less frequent backups are rather useless. Network storage capacity comes to almost no cost these days, and are the only way that really works (no user interaction, can be very frequent, off-site).


CategorySpec

DesktopTeam/Specs/Oneiric/DejaDup (last edited 2011-05-18 05:58:55 by pitti)